jerome, az + mingus hike

I’ve really got to come up with some better post titles! I’ll work on that!

We headed up to Mingus Mountain for some hiking. Realized about halfway up that we had forgotten the hiking book. But no worries, the road was closed at the top of the mountain so we parked and walked the road for several miles. It was nice and chilly. Temps in the upper 20s. Elevation 7,000 ft

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the views02

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thought it would be safest for all, if the boys sat at a safe distance

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this is why i spend time training my guys. sit/down stays when asked. off leash. well mannered dogs have more fun

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another thanks to michelle for the fantastic hats! it was in the upper 20s  and breezy. our melons were nice and toasty!03

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this is the first time sam has seen snow since we’ve had him. there’s a good chance that he didn’t see any before we got him either. he really didn’t seem impressed 16

mingus lake. more like a pond. but it was pretty17

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we forgot how much scout loves snow. especially when he’s wearing his muscle shirt25

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they always look so vicious when playing but they were having a blast28

it’s nice to be able to wander amongst the trees with no fixed endpoint 29

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it snowed for a while. then it stopped and the blue skies started to peek ou

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after a couple of hours hiking, we headed back to the car and drove down to the town of jerome.

jerome is known as the most vertical city and largest ghost town in america. it’s a cute little artsy town now. here’s some history i borrowed from web:

“Located high on top of Cleopatra Hill (5,200 feet) between Prescott and Flagstaff is the historic copper mining town of Jerome, Arizona. Once known as the wickedest town in the west, Jerome was a copper mining camp, growing from a settlement of tents to a roaring mining community. Four disastrous fires destroyed large sections of the town during its early history, resulting in the incorporation of the City of Jerome in 1899.

Founded in 1876, Jerome was once the fourth largest city in the Arizona Territory. The population peaked at 15,000 in the 1920′s. The Depression of the 1930′s slowed the mining operation and the claim went to Phelps Dodge, who holds the claim today. World War II brought increased demand for copper, but after the war, demand slowed. Dependent on the copper market, Phelps Dodge Mine closed in 1953. The remaining 50 to 100 hardy souls promoted the town as a historic ghost town. In 1967 Jerome was designated a National Historic District by the federal government. Today Jerome is a thriving tourist and artist community with a population of about 450.

Jerome sits above what was the largest copper mine in Arizona and produced an astonishing 3 million pounds of copper per month. Men and women from all over the world made their way to Arizona to find work and maybe a new way of life. Today the mines are silent, and Jerome has become the largest ghost town in America.”

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cool dog art31

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i’m in love with the colorful chickens!

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look at the chili pepper’s boots! and his twiggy little legs40

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these guys were cool. i wonder if they are hand painted42

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a littler closer look at the details44

i think the Muertos are pretty cool and very colorful. there was lots of them around45

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these t-shirts are made by a local artist. a girl needs a souvenir, right?53

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this was carved into a bench. pretty cool60

this is a cool moon. but it kind of freaked me out. i’m confident it was watching me!

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2 thoughts on “jerome, az + mingus hike

    • It’s cool! I think there’s a lot more to Jerome than just the shopping area. It was cold and we were tired from hiking, so we just did a quick trip. Enjoy if you make it there!

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